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of technology. but what we are seeing here in doha are many developed countries leaving the kyoto protocol, and joining the united states, who had left some time ago, and the remaining members in the kyoto protocol are putting forward emission reduction figures that are too low -- something like 20% for europe, which they have already achieved. so the system we started with in bali, five years ago, that developed countries would cut emissions by 5% to 20%, a similar effort under the convention. >> the u.s. did not sign onto the kyoto protocol? >> under bush, they agreed they would do similar to would be to recall program -- joke part of all members would do -- tkyoto protocol but never signed on. now each country puts forward whenever it can do, and that will not be challenged. this is not based on science. as a result we have very low emissions coming from developed countries, which means they are showing a bad example to developing countries who would want to do more, but seeing that leaders are not living up to their expectations, this has repressed their ability to do more in terms of
on these widely dispersed cases, the cdc is turning to technology. one of the ways that we've been doing that is similar to what the fbi does in terms to having a national database of fingerprints of criminals. anytime one of those bugs is isolated, either from a human stool sample or from a food product, what happens is it goes into a network of laboratories that are capable of performing the fingerprints, using standardized methodology. changes in how food is grown and handled, increased international travel, people crammed togethe in uanitary nditions-- all contribute to the emergence of these new and deadlier microbes, but there is another critical factor. david bennett: we now have the threat that our major tools, the antibiotics that we can treat bacterial infections, are being compromised. there's a lot of resistance to antibiotics, both in hospitals and communities, so we're very worried about what will happen there. and this means increased cost, and it also means in some cases we can't effectively treat some infections, or it's much more difficult to treat. stephen ostroff: so
: so for copan's metateros, the market potential was limited by technology. because they had to carry the stones to market on their backs, the market had to be close by. filomeno's problem is similar. although he can use a bus to get his metates to market, the cost of transportation must be added to the sale price. if filomeno transports his metates much beyond the neighboring market town, he must add the cost of a round-trip bus fare to the price. and this would make his metates too expensive. ten miles from filomeno's house is the town of tlacolula. market is held here once a week. almost everything is sold by the actual producers or their families. weekly markets are one of the most ancient of economic institutions. today, sales involve cash. but until quite recently, most societies, like the ancient maya, depended on barter, so much of one commodity for so much of another. market at tlacolula is highly competitive. there's a large number of sellers for each product all in competition with each other, and all within sight of each other. and the buyers, also people from the countrys
on now. the physics-types and the technology-types are working on. but when--and if and when they're solved, things are gonna be like different. really different. questions? i didn't quite catch the deal on breeder reactors because, say, losing mass is the name of the game. redirectors make it. let's go to that very, very quickly. what a breeder reactor does is very simple. if in your reactor you have 238 of plutonium-- or 235 of plutonium causing the fusion, if you put in some u-238-- i erased it over here-- the 238 will be turned to plutonium. so you're really not gaining any mass. what you're doing is you're converting something that's not very helpful, 238. you're converting that to something that is very helpful, energy-wise, plutonium. and the analogy i used in the book is like putting gasoline-- putting some water in your gasoline in your car. so it isn't like you get more mass than you started with. you're just converting the water to the gasoline. or in this case, you're converting the 238 to plutonium. and it turns out, every reactor is all the time breeding. if you have
poor countries to develop cleanly and sustainably, and opening up technology, finance, and getting developed countries to reduce their emissions as fast as possible. >> i want to thank you all for being with us. that does it for our show today. we will be back here tomorrow. amanda nesheiwat, angeline annesteus, and marco cadena. earlier, we made a mistake misidentifying abdullah bin hamad al-attiyah as fahad bin mohammed al attiyah. democracy now! is looking for feedback from people who appreciate the closed captioning. email your comments to outreach@democracynow.org or mail them to democracy now! p.o. box 693, new york, ny 10013. box 693, new york, ny 10013. tavis: good evening. smiley. -- from los angeles, em tavis smiley. tonight, a conversation with 14- time grammy winner alicia keys. "girl on fire" features many artists, including john legend and bruno mars. our conversation with alicia keys starts right now. keys starts right now.
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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